Windows XP Dial up networking bluetooth or tethering

Discussion in 'Moto Q 9h' started by jasoninaz, May 11, 2008.

  1. jasoninaz

    jasoninaz New Member

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    Windows XP Dial up networking bluetooth or tethering

    Installed Motorola USB driver (*supplied on cd, or website here
    http://commerce.motorola.com/cgi-bin/ncomm...=1&zipcode=
    created a Dial up connection through windows (XP sp2)
    phone number = *99#
    username: WAP@CINGULARGPRS.COM
    password: CINGULAR1
    Next go to Control Panel>
    Phone and Modems>
    click on Motorola USB ... >
    Properties > Advanced tab >
    type +CGDCONT=1,"IP","apn_name" (*Replacing apn_name with your APN like WAP.CINGULAR <<NOTICE THE UPPERCASE!)

    Here is the newest usb drivers January 18, 2008


    This USB Driver is used for connecting your Motorola handset to a 32-bit Windows computer via a USB cable.

    Ok, I went out and purchased a bluetooth dongle for my laptop because I don't like wires. It was about 30 bucks and it rocks.

    http://us.kensington.com/html/9403.html

    you tell your phone to accept connections from your laptop and it will use the modem on the phone and expect to get about 320bps and 128 up.

    And never ever tell AT&T your doing this. I had to show the guys at the ATT store how to do this. Otherwise you will pay for tethering.
  2. kareljack

    kareljack Active Member

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    I have a question. If I use the internet connection sharing tool on my Q9H, will AT@T know about it and bill me accordingly?
    Thanks.
  3. jasoninaz

    jasoninaz New Member

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    Answering your question.

    I've been using it for months now. Over bluetooth, its impossible for them to monitor the data over the bluetooth connection. Now tethering, I used tethering when I was in PA because it was before I picked up the bluetooth adapter. No change either and I'll explain why below.

    Because your using WAP.CINGULARGPRS.COM and the native password to the device they don't know the difference between the computer and the device. I know this because I used to work in support of an cellphone company and we noticed a few people whom had figured this trick out. The problem is, it would be a total nightmare for them to change the user names and passwords, its pretty uniform across the board and, you are talking about a change that would affect millions if they decided to really care about it.

    I even showed the guys in the ATT office and they thought it rocked. They also confirmed the user name and password to the proxy server. Which is what I listed above.

    Also there is no difference between the tethered speeds and this way. The difference is your paying for something you can get for free.

    Jason


  4. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    Thats a very touchy subject. In the end, it depends on how much you use it. If you are attempting to use the phone instead of a home ISP, then yes, you WILL get caught. If you occasionally use it while at the airport, or here and there when you don't have an internet connection, then you will most likely be okay.

    Another safe purchase is to buy PDAnet. Its a very legitimate, well made program that makes using the internet and tethering quite easy. When it comes to legality, you could make an argument (though I don't know how truly successful in the end) that you're using a legitimate program that you're paying for, and you should be allowed to use it to its fullest capabilities. You are using a feature of your phone.
  5. kareljack

    kareljack Active Member

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    Thanks for your responses. I hope I dont seem obtuse here but I just want to make sure.
    I am using the internet connection sharing tool on my Q9H while connected via USB. I also have an unlimited data/PDA ) plan. When I select the sharing tool on my phone it shows that I am using the media.net connection.
    Now, one of you says that I wont get noticed and the other says I will ...depending on useage. I will stop for now, but does anyone know for sure?
    Thanks for your time and patience with my questions.
  6. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    No offense mexiken, but that doesn't make sense to me. The phone is already capable of tethering out of the box. The only difference is that PDAnet configures the settings for you automatically. Why pay someone to do that when you already know the settings and able to configure it manually. It's like paying for tethering twice. The issue is not whether an app or you are tethering. The issue is that your comp is tethered to your phone and is accessing the carrier's network. And that's what the carrier wants you to pay for. Which is bull ish!

    I have used the above method already. Haven't got billed yet. But then again I rarely use it as I leave my laptop at home most of the time.
  7. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    Well, I might agree with Jason in regards to the proxy, however, its quite obvious as to the session data sizes when you're using your phone and a PC. They're printed, in detail, on your bill.

    The average mobile page might be around 4-40 KB. PC sites start around 100 and go up from there .

    For example, I just launched yahoo.com from both my PC and phone.

    Phone = 4.05 KB
    PC = ~119 KB

    Now just imagine, EVERY page you click, the disparity between the two sizes doubles. So say you click 2 pages, the difference in size is not 115 KB, but somewhere around 230. And it keeps going that way.

    Anyone who thinks that they can somehow "hide" their internet usage (as far as data transferred) is just fooling themselves. There really isn't any way to get close to PC usage sizes on a phone. Too many websites have mobile versions of pages now. Just not gonna happen. So therefore, AT&T could very easily do a quick study, find out what the HEAVIEST legitimate users of PDA internet use, and write a quick billing app that flags accounts that are higher than that. Verizon already has a cap in place, its stated so in its contract and promo material mentioning internet access. And AT&T already has marketing programs that flag people who use services for which they have no plan for. So, there is no hiding it from them in the end, however, it just depends how much you use for them to justify coming after you and so forth.
  8. jasoninaz

    jasoninaz New Member

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    About two months ago I got a call from them about my data usage downloading books from audible.com. There is a smartphone feature called audible air. I download my books and podcasts via audible and they end up on my sd card. They started to talk about policy and this and that, I said well I signed up for unlimited data. So if you want to cancel my contract you can do that. But I'll post the conversation and outcome on digg.com, you see I told the lady, image is everything, and with the new Iphone if you start telling everyone that the unlimited is not really unlimited people will think twice about AT&T and they won't pick AT&T as a carrier. :angry:





  9. kareljack

    kareljack Active Member

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    I think I'll just play it safe and just forget about tethering. Even if I get PDANet working (I neglected to mention that I tried it but couldnt get it to work) just the fact about the huge discrepancies in page view sizes is enough to concern me.
    I appreciate everyone's input in this matter. Thanks.
  10. jasoninaz

    jasoninaz New Member

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    Thats the thing, PDANET sucks, I've looked at the code and it just doing a piggyback on the internet share, its no difference than I what I posted.

    Why would you pay for something that you can do yourself? Don't get suckered into buying that pos program.
  11. kareljack

    kareljack Active Member

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    The question I'm asking - to no one specifically - why risk drawing attention and the possibility of extra charges by using tethering?
    It sucks that AT&T are such hard asses about this. I understand the issues regarding overloading the network... but geez.
  12. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    My point exactly!
  13. jasoninaz

    jasoninaz New Member

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    Overloading the network, ok they are no where near hitting the overload on the network. When I was in Japan you would be getting 2.4 mpbs download and upload was just as fast, we are ass backwards when it comes to wireless here in the states.

    The whole time I was in Japan because (With AT&T World Traveler, calling while in Japan is only $1.69/minute!) I used skype and it was clear as a usual cellphone.

    Also AT&T owns more fiber than anyone else. Now google owns more dark fiber than anyone else and I'm very interested to see how that turns out.

    Right now there is a ton of overhead on the network, we are no where near the breaking point.

    Do not feel sorry for them!
  14. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    Im fully aware of the phone being able to tether out of the box. But if you read the stipulations of the contract, which you sign to sign up for service, it strictly states that the internet services are intended for the PHONE only, and tethering is NOT allowed without paying for it. I forget what the ramifications are for violating the rules, but I believe it includes, but is not limited to, cutting off your internet service, or billing you for it.

    The ICS shortcut that everyone uses is not readily available. Its a hidden app in the Windows folder. People find it, make a shortcut, and start using it. You're circumventing the device to fit your needs, which, while I agree is crap that you can't use it, technically isn't right. In the end, you own the phone yes, but AT&T owns the network.

    The settings above are also not readily available. They're for customers who have the tethering plan.

    Thats where PDAnet comes in. You could make the ignorance plea, and say because PDAnet circumvented those methods, and did the work for you, you are absolved of the violation. Its a long shot, but its better than saying, "I read on some forum that I could use the ICS shortcut to tether", or, "I read on a website how to set up a DUN connection" That puts the blame square on you.
  15. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    You're not the only one. There's a lot of horror stories out there, about customers getting billed THOUSANDS after the fact....
  16. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    I wasn't even quite aware of HOW much of a difference the pages were. It was quite shocking to me too.

    Just proceed with caution is my best advice.
  17. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    Its also a matter of not paying for something you should normally get elsewhere, or even internally. AT&T offers DSL service in its landline areas, so obviously it doesn't benefit them to let you just run wild with your PDA plan.

    But also, if you can imagine. In LA alone, there are more than 5 million AT&T customers. If even a half of million of them tethered their phones as permanent ISP for their PC/laptop, it would just be chaos. The network isn't built to handle that much data. Thats why WAP was invented in the first place. The network has been built with certain parameters, not able to handle PC like data transferring.
  18. mexiken

    mexiken New Member

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    I believe you are confused on how the 3G networks data streams work. They work like FiOs in the sense that user experiences are meant to be similar. In that, there is no "sharing" of the line like on GSM networks, or cable internet. So the fact that you get such good speeds is a result of the protocol used by both your phone (and Motorola is ahead of the curve in this respect) and the tower. Not because of how many people are on it. Yes, if there are A LOT of people on the network, it may slow down your speeds some as the towers various processing machines will obviously start backing up, but the speed itself is not designed to suffer. Or at least, thats the way the technology was theorized. It seems to pretty much work that way however.
  19. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    Exactly! AT&T owns the network, not tethering. Some of us already subscribe to an unlimited data plan just to access their network. Now they want to own how we access that same network. Doesn't make sense. It's like charging us bluetooth. I'm sure as some are aware, the handsfree law is taking effect in california in july. What if, because of the necessity, AT&T decided to charge us bluetooth connection between our headsets and phone? Would people be as accepting then.

    And as far as the function being readily available, it is documented in the phone's PDF manual file found in the motorola website. All we need is the user name and password from AT&T. So in that sense, they are charging us twice to access the same newtwork.

    I guess in the end I can argue and argue about how wrong it is. The fact remains, we are unfairly charged for a feature that we own. I'm all for capitalism, not exploitation. Just doesn't seem right. So I will screw them over every chance I get, because they always find ways to do the same. :angry:
  20. tendomentis

    tendomentis New Member

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    I wonder how my VPN usage looks to AT&T when I use my phone to tether onto my corporate network. Do they just see one HUGE block of data? And, since it's all encrypted, they couldn't tell if it's my phone or my laptop?

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