Windows Phone 7 vs Android

Discussion in 'Windows Phone 7' started by chris, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    Windows Phone 7 vs Android

    This is going to be an interesting fight. Traditionally, Windows Mobile has been very open to tweaking, etc. Android is the new king of that jungle. Makes me wonder how open Windows Phone 7 will be...

    If Microsoft can get devs on board, I think they will take a bit bite out of Android. If an Android user doesn't have a lot invested in Apps, it becomes more about the OS and the hardware. If the OS delivers, we know they'll have fantastic hardware.

    It's in vogue now to say Windows Phone 7 is dead out of the gate. That couldn't be further from the truth.
  2. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    From the early articles I read, I had thought that WP7 is going to be more or less closed. I haven't since read much since I am now part of the Android Army. If that is the case, being locked down, I don't think it has much of a chance out of the gate.

    With the Q the best part was to tinker and change and personalize to your liking, I don't like being told what can and can't be done to technology that I purchase (even if it is subsidized, I mean I WILL be paying for it for 2 years under contract). Having used Android and it being 'open' I can't see myself going back.
  3. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    To me, I wonder if it'll have iPhone appeal. If you are a Verizon customer, you're options now are webOS and Android. I wonder what percentage of users don't necessarily care about open/closed. Are they shopping hardware moreso than OS? I don't know..
  4. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    and of course BB. Honestly I don't think it will have iPhone appeal, now if Verizon gets the iPhone, WP doesn't have a chance on Verizon.
    chris likes this.
  5. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    If Verizon gets the iPhone, the whole market is in turmoil.

    I see the UI of Windows Phone 7 to be pretty impressive. What annoys me about Android are the apps -- plenty of them, but a lot them are real ugly. I think that's one of the big advantages of the iPhone. The apps are consistent, even if they are bad. If all the Windows Phone apps have that Metro UI, it'll give the phone a nice user experience.

    I agree, Windows Phone 7 will definitely cut into BlackBerry sales.
  6. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    Agreed, a lot of the apps on Android aren't all that great, and probably drain the hell out of the batteries. But what is good, is that it's easier for people to develop for that platform, even a non-programmer like myself can make something. But that is also the downfall, any yahoo (like myself) can make something.

    I do think that eventually it will get better, user reviews and input will definitely help that situation.

    As for WP, I think BB will take the largest hit, to me, WP seems to be a no non-sense device, it is what it is and it does it well. Just like a BB, but with Android getting 200,000 activations a day, thats an awful lot of contracts locked down for 2 years.
  7. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    I think it will get better. I remember writing how Google's Gingerbread will be focused on UI, plus they hired the UI guy from Palm.

    How many apps have bought for your Android phone? If you were intrigued by the Windows Phone 7 OS, would losing your Android apps be a big issue?
  8. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    Very true, I forgot about them getting the WebOS guy, that should definitely help.

    I only purchased a handful, as most are free. As for losing apps, well, I lost all apps when I went from WM to Android, just as I would have lost all apps from WM to WP.

    As of right now, I can honestly say I am not all that swayed by WP (I have been known to change my mind often), but I really do love Android, that community as a whole is extremely lively. Sadly not so much over at eA like the eQ days, BUT overall its crazy how fast things are changing and coming out.

    MS has been in the game a long time, Google, not so much, Android can only one direction (in my opinion), as far as MS, well, thats to been seen.
  9. misterSelf

    misterSelf New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    I actually like what I see in WP7, and this is coming from a guy, who, over the last year, have owned/used the iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4, Blackberry Bold, Tour, and Storm2, Samsung Instinct HD and Moment, HTC Hero, Droid Eris, and Nexus 1, Motorola Droid and Droid X, and the Palm Pre. I realize that most people are currently caught in the Android force field, but I find it, like most Google products (in their early stages), to still be in beta. It's unpolished, clunky, cluttered, and very Linux-sy. It does a lot, but does very few things well. I, for one, am over the novelty.

    I do like the iPhone OS, but I don't wish to be locked into Apple's iTunes ecosystem. Blackberry is behind the times in OS and hardware. I do admit that at on point I was a crackberry addict, but that was when e-mail was central to my life and no other platform did e-mail well. Those days are long gone, and, frankly, other than e-mail (and BBM), the Blackberry doesn't offer much over any other smartphone OS. webOS is innovative, slick, and smooth, but Palm has a lot to prove in the hardware department and I'm not sure HP is the answer.

    Microsoft has the hardware partners and as they did with Windows 7 (in the computer market) I think they can make people rethink Microsoft when it comes to mobile devices. After Vista many people wrote off Microsoft. 7 changed all that. Maybe Windows Phone 7 can do the same. I'm certainly optimistic and willing to give it a chance. Video after video (previews of Windows Phone 7) consistently show an OS that is equally different, innovative, well thought out, and (seemingly) polished as any on the market. I admit that I haven't used it myself and once the OS (on whatever device) hits the market my opinion can change, but I'm not willing to write them off just yet. Microsoft has the talent, the legacy, and the money to do almost anything. It's a matter of execution, delivery, and marketing at this point
  10. Peregrine

    Peregrine Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    797
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have always rooted for Microsoft but I think it is just taking to long and they have been behind for far to long. Android phones have passed the iPhone in sales Get the iPhone on Verizon for people clamoring for that and the Blackberry Torch for the die hard BB fans? Good night Microsoft.
    I do believe that MS will never be a big player in this market ever again. MS never really had that die hard fanboi crowd, and I fear never will at this point.

    To answer your question, Apps will not keep me on a particular phone. However a LACK of apps will drive me away from a phone (one big reason I left WinMoby in the first place).

    I also think the lack of traffic in this "Windows Phone 7" forum is very indicative of what is going on in the market now. People have already lost interest in MS as a player in this field. I don't think they can get it back.
    :(
  11. jammydoug

    jammydoug Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi
    Do you need windows on your computer to have a windows phone?I know this seems really simple, and it may be, but I am looking to get a new phone, and I like the design and layout of the Windows HTC phones, but I was wondering if having a Windows computer is necessary for those phones. I am a Mac computer person.
  12. Michael Melton

    Michael Melton New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am VERY impressed from the keynote at WP7. I think I want one as it does what WebOS wanted to do: simplify things and merge stuff together in the os.

    Android is good, but so freaking fragmented. To many user interfaces. The new samsung galaxy s phones have their own, ridiculous. Plus being Linux derived and open source, it is just to open. Microsoft did a WONDERFUL thing in standards in the hardware and software. I watched a phone dog video and that Bing driving is IN THE OS not changed by carrier. Verizon can't change that and the way it should be. It will grow and copy and paste coming, should give android and ios a run for their money. RIM is just there and will be for business and from their torch phone and the new flip phone, still don't get it.
  13. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    I am curious, you keep mentioning 'fragmentation', saw it in another thread as well. How can you be so certain that WP will not have any fragmentation? At some point wont there will be an update that certain phones wont get? How can you be certain that carriers will always release new WP Phones with the newest OS on it? Android has as you say, become fragmented due to the speed of the OS development, of late it has been slowed dramatically. Its up to the carriers to determine what they put on the phone, not MS, so I believe until the carriers get up to snuff on how fast the OS develops there will always be some sort of fragmentation.
  14. Michael Melton

    Michael Melton New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Uh, got some things wrong there. First, Android is fragmented due to be Open Sourced. Google doesn't charge a dime to license the OS. :eek:Google doesn't impose any regulations either. It was quoted on Engadget and other sites that no default UI would be enforced as it "violates open source" (look that up I can't remember when and it was straight from Google). So being fully open sourced like Linux, it will NEVER be fluid. No matter how slow or fast the development is it will be different builds, different ui's etc. Example: I have an HTC Hero. I can't get any OFFICIAL Android past 2.1 In 1.6 I could do vanilla ui, turning Sense UI off. In 2.1 HTC took the vanilla ui out. :mad: No sense in that. I had to root my phone and put in Cyanogen mod to run Froyo 2.2 in vanilla build. Over 100% speed increase. If Google did what they were suppose to do and impose standards, I would have gotten an official 2.2 update. Oh well.

    Did you watch the 60 minute keynote with Balmer? They said directly in the video they put STANDARDS for the hardware (no lame low end smart phones. Standards in cpu, ram and screen plus in buttons and the camera) and the os is STANDARD on all devices and they would push the updates to ALL devices and ALL carriers. ;) This is how it should be. Carriers should shut their mouth and quit messing with the operating systems. Apply did with iOS, Palm/HP did it with WebOS and now Microsoft is doing it with Windows Phone 7. Windows Phone 7 will be the same experience in any country and any carrier plus or minus small apps etc. When copy and paste goes out, it goes to ALL the phones.

    So yes, Microsoft controls Windows Phone 7. The license is right, standardize hardware and software and I think it will start to give Android a run for it's money. :cool:
  15. n99hockey

    n99hockey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    57,525
    Likes Received:
    15
    Open Sourced doesn't make it fragmented.
    WM 6 and 6.5 weren't open sourced and you just said it was fragmented.
    The UI doesn't make it fragmented, UI creates a different experience, if you like stock Android then you get a device that can do that or root and load a ROM that can, same for SenseUI, etc. A carrier releasing a 2.1 device when 2.2 has been out for months makes it fragmented. But like I said before, the same can happen for WP7, eventually they wont get any more updates, and thats the carrier decision, and then people will complain about that, just like old shool WM5 and 6 and 6.5. All I am saying is that its not Android that has fragmentation, seems thats all anyone can complain about.

    I am not going to knock WP7 as a whole, there seems to be people who want standardization. I mean when people wanted standardize stuff they could just buy an iPhone and have Jobs tell you what you can and can't get, seems like Ballmer (and HP) is heading in the same direction, and if people want that, hey thats cool, thats what they want.

    Sounds good now, but who knows what comes down the line, how it will pan out. I really loved my MotoQ(s), and WM and was sad to have to leave it. Remember when you could hack it and do what you wanted and not have to wait for WM to release some crap update 6 months later that didn't fix it? Now you have no choice.

    PS. Its nice to see some life here at eWM! :)
  16. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    With any platform, there will be some level of fragmentation. iOS included. People who upgraded their iPhone 3G to iOS 4 saw sluggish performance that was downright painful. As iOS progresses, some iPhones do not have all the features due to hardware limitations.

    What fragments Android is all the carrier crap and customized UI's. It adds a step before [insert phone manufacturer] can deliver updates. The more layers, I presume the more difficulty involved in delivering the lastest and greatest OS improvements.

    I'm interested to see how webOS 2.0 performs on gen 1 hardware. Will it be faster, slower? Honestly, I think it could go either way.
  17. chris

    chris Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,069
    Likes Received:
    37
    Plus 1. Nice to see a little life in the old site.
  18. Michael Melton

    Michael Melton New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Open source is the definition of fragmentation. There is no standard Linux kernel because every joe or bob hacker/programmer can recompile. UI changes are fragmentation when core code is removed or altered. Apps in the android market will not run on some phones due to the ui and changes made to android; read comments in apps in the market. I have seen/read hundreds of people say this, thus fragmentation. WM 6 and 6.5 had this to with sense coming to WM. It took HTC adding a GOOD browser to make WM 6.5 look good, I know I researched almost go the htc wm devices with the fancy additions to WM 6.5 before going Pre. WM had a different flavor every phone.

    When it comes to iOS, you don't have any more fragmentation other than the main os levels not working on certain hardware, which will happen to WebOS, Android, WM7 etc. or any piece of technology as time and tech advances. It will happen to WP7, but if you are on modern hardware, the patches will be universal. I don't mind waiting on the main OS writer to push the patches, as they will work. In time the big bugs go away and then it gets real smoooooth. But this doesn't happen to Android as Carriers and/or phone makers get to screw with the OS. My HTC Hero can does run Froyo beautifully and IF Google did it right, then it would be out there. The way the fragmentation is now, a perfectly good phone looses a HUGE code increase (70% says Google) in Froyo due to laziness in standards.

    Now Stevo Jobs nut grip on the iOS is bad, I 150% agree with you. In that case you have standards, but TO MUCH control. In Android you have NO standards and full control, thus almost chaos. To me WebOS was a good middle ground as Palm let the homebrew community go forth but the OS was standardized and it seems (can't tell till WP7 comes out) that MS will standardize the OS and the core kernel but in the end third party support will make it great.

    People do gripe on fragmentation as the next Android phone you pick up is different and have to learn a new UI. A buddy at where I work (I do IT) got the samsung galaxy s on Verizon, no slider keyboard. OMG a nice phone, but the custom ui turns me off. Why keep messing with Android?

    WP7 will let you customize just like WebOS, but more. There will be widgets/live tiles, HTC is making some. Every WP7 front page will be different, THERE is your "spice of life" and "individuality" without fragmenting your OS. ;)

    Good discussion, hope you know I am just having a good back and forth, not arguing. Most get their panties in a bunch and want to fight. :cool:
  19. Michael Melton

    Michael Melton New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Pre 2 is a pathetic cop out by Palm/HP. I know I know, that is harsh :D but damn it, they could have gone around 4 inch super amoled screen or similar, bigger keyboard and then it would be better. It looks like the Pre, just "fixed". Lazy to me, but I DO want to see WebOS 2.0.
  20. matty032

    matty032 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    You are exactly right. Android is rapidly becoming just like Winmo has been the last ten years. Manufacturers messing them up with their shell(s). (Sense, Touchwiz, Blur, etc.) We are up to three markets now, just like the old Winmo. (Amazon, Google, and Verizon) And the open part as far as homemade ROMs is quickly coming to an end. Motorola is trying to lock down their phones, HTC has fixed the G2 to reload their rom, after a reboot. We will see Android become totally unrecognizable in a few years. The same mistakes MS has made the last ten years. Somewhere between Apple, and Android would be the place to be. MS at least now, says that is where they are coming in this time. We will see......I just got my Droid X, so I have two years to watch and see this play out. But, right now, if I had the choice I would go with Winmo, even with the current app deficit. Just because I can't get a true Android phone, with no crap on it.....
    Michael Melton and chris like this.

Share This Page