Post Your Pet(s)

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by dafoxs, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    Woah!!! Poor bird :embarassed:.
  2. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    Do you trim her toe nails?
    Do you know how to stop bleeding in birds?
  3. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    Im scared to trim her nails. I might clip too close. I dunno... she never bled before.
  4. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    Yeah..tell me about it. It took her about 6 weeks to fully recover and lots and lots of anti-inflammatories, but she's doing great. She's a trooper! <G>
  5. dafoxs

    dafoxs New Member

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    didn't know he or she died. I was going to go for that record.
  6. rudeboy

    rudeboy New Member

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    *looks for picture of head lice*

    :}
  7. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    Well, for some unsolicited advice....read below...<G>

    You should trim her nails. Most perches are not hard enough wood to keep the nails worn down to the point where they would be in the wild. Long toe nails are problematic because they reach up and scratch....if they are too long, they can easily cut.

    The thing with birds is they have about 1/20th of the blood clotting factor of humans. So they can bleed out very easily, but it would be rare to do so from a toe nail trimming...like almost unheard of rare.

    Trimming toes typically takes 2 people. It can be done with a special tool, but a regular nail clippers works perfectly well. While one person holds the bird, typically upside down, the other one lightly grabs one foot and prys open the toes. Depending on the color of the bird, you may be able to see the vein in the toe. That's called the quick. You don't want to cut into that--because well, it's a vein... You want to cut down to above that.

    Now with some birds, especially darker color birds, you can't see the quick, so it's a guesstimate. Sometimes you guess wrong and clip too deep. After you do it a time or two, you'll instinctively know where it is.

    If you clip too deep, you'll see blood start to well out. If it is gushing / pulsing, you're in deep trouble and you need a vet fast. Like I said...that's exceptionally rare. More often, what you will see is a drop well up, similar to when you get a paper cut or a small nick on your hand.

    The easiest way to control this is to have a bowl of flour with you. Flip the bird right side up and hold it in the flour for a few minutes. Note: they won't like this. After a minute or two, the flour will coagulate the cut along with the natural clotting factors and your bird will be fine.

    If you haven't done this before and are uncomfortable with it, you can try doing a few sessions where you clip just a little tiny bit at a time...almost shaving the toenail in small slices if you will.

    You could also ask your vet to show you exactly how it should be done so you are schooled by an expert. PS--make sure your vet has avian experience. It is a speciality.

    In place of flour, you can also use stypic powder, but it is more expensive and flour will do the same thing.

    If your bird ever gets bloodied up for some reason, pack the wound site in flour as fast as you can. Then call the vet <G>
  8. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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  9. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    Very nice right up. Maybe we should get RB or Scott to stick this in the FAQ section??? hehe... jk. But yah, thanks for that. I will try to get the wife to trim the nails while I hold her down (the bird :tounge:).
  10. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    Alex was very very young to die. Most parrots live 80+ years. MaCaws live 120+
  11. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    What about cockatiels?
  12. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    NP. If you haven't done it before, she (the bird, not the wife <G>) won't be used to it either. Flip her upside down every once in a while so she doens't panic when you do it. You can also study her toes, in bright light and see if you see the quick. If you can see that, half the battle is won.

    Talking softly to them while you're doing it helps. Helps keep them calm.
  13. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    Helps with the wife too. :tounge:
  14. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    Depends where you read. There are two basic ranges out there. Most sources say 12-15 years. A few say 15-20. General consensus is that anything over 15 is pushing into rare territory. That's why mine, at 17 and 18 are "stars" at the vet school. They're the oldest any of them have ever seen and worked with.

    The oldest known cockatiel was I beleive, 30 years old.
  15. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    I'll try and remember that <G>
  16. dafoxs

    dafoxs New Member

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    You will find out fast if the bird bites. They turn into the she devil at first.
  17. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    By the way, having a cuttlebone in her cage for her to chew on will greatly help her calcium levels.
  18. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    I assume you're talking about being flipped over and nails trimmed?

    If so, a good trick is to have the wife hold the bird because wives generally have a lot more rings on their fingers. Married males typically only have one <G>. The bird will go after the wife's rings and the husband can do the toes. Males are *generally* a little less squeamish in this regard as well, so they tend to get in and get the toes done and the bird back up on the right side.
  19. EQBob

    EQBob New Member

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    How in the blue blazes have you racked up 5600 some odd posts in 10 months? That's approximately 18 per day, every day....day in and day out...That's um...amazing!
  20. ninjaap

    ninjaap Moderator

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    He knows quite a bit.

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