Disable USB Charging

Discussion in 'Motorola Q' started by _Dave, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. _Dave

    _Dave New Member

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    Disable USB Charging

    Does anyone know how to diable USB charging without purchasing registry hack software? I want to sync to pc multiple times a day without getting a partial charge on the battery each time.

    Any ideas?
  2. PacoJr67

    PacoJr67 Active Member

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    if you're worried about the memory effect, you don't need to be. that only affects nickel based batteries
  3. _Dave

    _Dave New Member

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    Yeah, I was worried that alot of partial charges would affect the battery life.
  4. PacoJr67

    PacoJr67 Active Member

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    actually there a lot of people under the impression that fully discharging the battery can harm it, but I haven't found any evidence to support that either. Most days I charge my phone at least twice a day, sometimes more depending on usage.
  5. _Dave

    _Dave New Member

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    So I take it the old school rules of no partial charges and a full discharge once a week don't apply anymore?
  6. PacoJr67

    PacoJr67 Active Member

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    nope, LiIon (and LiPo) batteries don't need that any more. the memory effect (which all those things were supposed to forestall) was caused by nickel in the batteries crystallizing. LiIon batteries have no nickel in them so no memory effect.
  7. abdomega

    abdomega New Member

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    Good to know info in this thread. I'm in and out of activesync daily.
  8. Eugene

    Eugene New Member

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    Careful, its not caused by the nickel, its the combination of nickel and cadmuim (Hope I spelled that correctly, I'm at work so no spell checker), NiMH (Nickel Metal Hydride) doesn't have the issue either. I see a lot of people qouting that old battery university article where they lumped nicad and nimh together inder nickel even though they are different.

    Lithium Ion batteries have a finite life cycle no matter how well they are cared for. They loose 10-20% of their capacity per year and typically have a MTBF of 300 cycles and partial cycles add up. So if you charge it 10% for 10 times thats one cycle. So the little charges add up but no more than full charges. And remember MTBF is just a target number to exceed, there isn't a 300 cycle counter inside that will make it stop working.
  9. PacoJr67

    PacoJr67 Active Member

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    true, thanks for the backup:2cool:
  10. psychedelicNerd

    psychedelicNerd New Member

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    What about overcharging?

    I have a motorola droid. I am usually very particular about not overcharging my phone or having it run thru the least charge cycles (Won't worry about the charge cycles anymore based on the above discussion). But what about overcharging? If i keep my phone docked in the cradle with it getting it's charge from the continuously even when it's a full 100%, will that burn or reduce the life of the battery?
  11. PacoJr67

    PacoJr67 Active Member

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    basically, what happens is that the charging circuit stops charging the phone when the charge is complete, but continues to provide power for the phone (like you see in a laptop) then when the charge drops below a certain level it would resume charging again. I've been keeping my phones plugged in overnight for years and never run into a problem
  12. sherri

    sherri Active Member

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    THIS IS DIRECT FROM THE MOTOROLA DROID FULL USER MANUAL! (Not the "pamphlet" they include with the phone...



    Safety, Regulatory & Legal
    Battery Use & Safety
    Battery Use & Safety Important: Handle and store batteries properly to avoid injury or damage.
    Most battery issues arise from improper handling of batteries, and particularly from
    the continued use of damaged batteries.
    DON’Ts
    • Don’t disassemble, crush, puncture, shred, or otherwise attempt to
    change the form of your battery.
    • Don’t let the phone or battery come in contact with water. Water can get
    into the phone’s circuits, leading to corrosion. If the phone and/or battery get
    wet, have them checked by your carrier or contact Motorola, even if they appear
    to be working properly.
    • Don’t allow the battery to touch metal objects. If metal objects, such as
    jewelry, stay in prolonged contact with the battery contact points, the battery
    could become very hot.
    • Don’t place your battery near a heat source. Excessive heat can damage the
    phone or the battery. High temperatures can cause the battery to swell, leak, or
    malfunction. Therefore:
    • Do not dry a wet or damp battery with an appliance or heat source, such as a
    hair dryer or microwave oven.
    • Avoid leaving your phone in your car in high temperatures.
    DOs
    • Do avoid dropping the battery or phone. Dropping these items, especially on
    a hard surface, can potentially cause damage.
    • Do contact your service provider or Motorola if your phone or battery
    has been damaged from dropping or high temperatures.
    Important: Use Motorola Original products for quality assurance and
    safeguards. To aid consumers in identifying authentic Motorola batteries from
    non-original or counterfeit batteries (that may not have adequate safety protection),
    Motorola provides holograms on its batteries. Consumers should confirm that any
    battery they purchase has a “Motorola Original” hologram.
    Motorola recommends you always use Motorola-branded batteries and
    chargers. Motorola mobile devices are designed to work with Motorola batteries.
    If you see a message on your display such as Invalid Battery or
    Unable to Charge, take the following steps:
    • Remove the battery and inspect it to confirm that it has a “Motorola Original”
    hologram;
    • If there is no hologram, the battery is not a Motorola battery;
    • If there is a hologram, replace the battery and retry charging it;
    • If the message remains, contact a Motorola authorized service center.
    Important: Motorola’s warranty does not cover damage to the phone caused by
    non-Motorola batteries and/or chargers.
    Warning: Use of a non-Motorola battery or charger may present a risk of fire,
    explosion, leakage, or other hazard.
    Proper and safe battery disposal and recycling: Proper battery disposal is not
    only important for safety, it benefits the environment. Consumers may recycle their
    used batteries in many retail or service provider locations. Additional information on
    proper disposal and recycling may be found on the Web:
    www.motorola.com/recycling
    www.rbrc.org/call2recycle/ (in English only)
    Disposal: Promptly dispose of used batteries in accordance with local
    regulations. Contact your local recycling center or national recycling
    organizations for more information on how to dispose of batteries.
    Warning: Never dispose of batteries in a fire because they may explode.
    Battery Charging
    Battery Charging Notes for charging your phone’s battery:
    • When charging your battery, keep it near room temperature. Never expose
    batteries to temperatures below 0°C (32°F) or above 45°C (113°F) when
    charging.
    • New batteries are not fully charged.
    • New batteries or batteries stored for a long time may take more time to charge.
    • Motorola batteries and charging systems have circuitry that protects the battery
    from damage from overcharging.


    ________________

    This question came up when I first got the Droid (release date). Mine kept shutting down and re-booting. Took it to the place I bought it (authorized store...), sales clerk looked at the back of phone w/battery removed and said I overcharged it. I shoved the manual in her face, and said "I DON'T THINK SO!"

    She gave me a new phone...:dft012:wink
  13. Eugene

    Eugene New Member

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    You can't overcharge a lithium ion in a device like a phone, the charge circuit has to turn off. If you were to over charge a lithium ion battery it will explode, thats why they have to have the charge circuit shut off.

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